Vegetable Garden in Phoenix

This is my first garden. I started the project thinking we’d just have 1 or 2 raised beds but it turned into something much bigger. Everything is done organically (no pesticides, no chemical fertilizers etc.) and “veganically” (without the use of manure, blood meal, bone meal or any kind of animal product). 99% of the vegetables are “heirloom” or “open-pollinated” meaning the seed has been bred true and saved for at least 50 years and will continue to breed true when you save the seed…as opposed to a “hybrid” which has generally been bred for appearance, shelf life, yield, disease resistance but rarely taste. A saved hybrid seed will not breed true to the vegetable you saved it from. My family and I built the structure. I started everything by seed, mostly indoors under a grow-light system. What I’m growing now: Tomatoes Peppers Eggplant Basil Squash Cucumbers Watermelon Cantaloupe Mint Green Beans Calendula (for tea) Tepary Beans Onions Garlic Indian Corn Strawberries Okra Tomatillo Sunflowers Parsley Amaranth What I grew over the winter: Lettuce Kale Rapini Broccoli Arugula Beets Carrots Peas Bok Choy Spigariello On an unrelated note, check out the band I’m in with my 3 brothers. www.kongos.com. For the safety of the garden a good bug removal is necessary.

The Vegetable Gardener’s Bible, 2nd Edition


The invaluable resource for home food gardeners! Ed Smith’s W-O-R-D system has helped countless gardeners grow an abundance of vegetables and herbs. And those tomatoes and zucchini and basil and cucumbers have nourished countless families, neighbors, and friends with delicious, fresh produce. The Vegetable Gardener’s Bible is essential reading for locavores in every corner of North America!

Everything you loved about the first edition of The Vegetable Gardener’s Bible is still here: friendly, accessible language; full-color photography; comprehensive vegetable specific information in the A-to-Z section; ahead-of-its-time commitment to organic methods; and much more. We should keep the place safe from rodents and pest and also learn about Health Hazards Associated With Rodents

Now, Ed Smith is back with a 10th Anniversary Edition for the next generation of vegetable gardeners. New to this edition is coverage of 15 additional vegetables, including an expanded section on salad greens and more European and Asian vegetables. Readers will also find growing information on more fruits and herbs, new cultivar photographs in many vegetable entries, and a much-requested section on extending the season into the winter months. No matter how cold the climate, growers can bring herbs indoors and keep hardy greens alive in cold frames or hoop houses.

The impulse to grow vegetables is even stronger in 2009 than it was in 2000, when Storey published The Vegetable Gardener’s Bible. The financial and environmental costs of fossil fuels raise urgent questions: How far should we be shipping food? What are the health costs of petroleum-based pesticides and herbicides? Do we have to rely on megafarms that use gasoline-powered machinery to grow and harvest crops? With every difficult question, more people think, “Maybe I should grow a few vegetables of my own.” This book will continue to answer all their vegetable gardening questions.

Praise for the First Edition:
“In every small town, there is a vegetable garden that people go out of the way to walk past. Smith is the guy who grew that garden.” — Verlyn Klinkenborg, The New York Times Book Review

“An abundance of photographs . . . visually bolster the techniques described, while frequent subheads, sidebars, and information-packed photo captions make the layout user-friendly . . . [Smith’s] book is thorough and infused with practical wisdom and a dry Vermont humor that should endear him to readers.” — Publisher’s Weekly

“Smith . . . clearly explains everything novice and experienced gardeners need to know to grow vegetables and herbs. . . . ” — Library Journal

“this book will answer all your questions as well as put you on the path to an abundant harvest. As a bonus, anecdotes and stories make this informative book fun to read.” – New York Newsday

Willow Stevens

Willow is a mother of six who begins to feel the empty nest, with faer oldest child living with his long-time girlfriend in another state, and the next three begin their talks about jobs and the excitement of college and living alone. Willow started couponing in 2007 to save their family some money on the grocery budget. That's how Freetail Therapy was born, so that fae could share their knowledge of saving money with others. Though the site has become so much more since then, and now includes homeschooling and homesteading info, Willow still does it all on a budget and shares how. Willow enjoys snagging freebies, snuggling with their dog, Xander, drinking decaf coffee, gardening, cannabis and of course, their large frugal family.

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